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A Neurological Sign

I am having tremors in my left hand. I don't know how long it's been going on, because I never paid attention before. I thought I was just getting low blood sugar, which I do if I forget to eat. But today I thought to check my right hand, and it is steady. I have had no caffeine. I had breakfast of cottage cheese and peaches about 2 hours ago. And my right hand is steady.

I noticed it because I was getting ready to put away the beads that have been on my desk for two days now. I was thinking of making something before I put it away. I was looking at beads and holding the dish in my left hand. The hand was trembling, and as I watched the motions increased. Pretty soon it was wobbling several inches.

What part of the brain was that? The part that inhibits the reflex to stop overshoot? I think there is something wrong with that part of my brain, on the right side. The side that I usually hold a phone to. First year medical student self diagnosis disease. Should I believe myself?

It is the cerebellum that dampens reflex oscillations. When I tense up all the muscles around my arm, wrist and hand, I can almost steady the hand, but not completely. Holding up an object makes the tremor bigger. Is this the inverse myotatic reflex?

It was more than a year ago that I noticed I tend to fall to one side when I stand up from sitting. I think I may pursue this and change my life dramatically. Enough denial. Enough accepting platitudes as if they were truth. What lengths sometimes I must go to break through my own denial. What proof I need of what is right before my eyes. I feel sick.

Comments

neptunia67
Jun. 29th, 2008 07:12 pm (UTC)
Could something like that also be caused by a pinched nerve in your back or shoulder?
liveonearth
Jul. 1st, 2008 02:36 am (UTC)
I don't think so. Pinched nerves can cause tingling, numbness, and pain, but oscillations like this are due to a problem in central programming of movement, or in this case the failure of the system to inhibit over-movement trying to stay in position. It is the spinocerebellum that does this inhibition of reflex oscillations.

I have a second theory about what is happening. My mental fuzziness and physical changes could be due to my repeated concussions, the two most severe ones being 1) from running the 20 foot waterfall Gorilla upside down and hitting my head twice on that bad run and 2) the 35 mph over the handlbars bike wreck of just two years ago.

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