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Nicotine and Dopamine


This is the language I am supposed to begin to understand...


1: Synapse. 2007 Aug;61(8):637-45.Links
The effect of nicotine on striatal dopamine release in man: A [11C]raclopride PET study.

Montgomery AJ, Lingford-Hughes AR, Egerton A, Nutt DJ, Grasby PM.
MRC-Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 0NN, United Kingdom. andrew.montgomery@ic.ac.uk
In common with many addictive substances and behaviors nicotine activates the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Brain microdialysis studies in rodents have consistently shown increases in extrasynaptic DA levels in the striatum after administration of nicotine but PET experiments in primates have given contradicting results. A recent PET study assessing the effect of smoking in humans showed no change in [(11)C]raclopride binding in the brain, but did find that "hedonia" correlated with a reduction in [(11)C]raclopride binding suggesting that DA may mediate the positive reinforcing effects of nicotine. In this experiment we measured the effect of nicotine, administered via a nasal spray, on DA release using [(11)C]raclopride PET, in 10 regular smokers. There was no overall change in [(11)C]raclopride binding after nicotine administration in any of the striatal regions examined. However, the individual change in [(11)C]raclopride binding correlated with change in subjective measures of "amused" and "happiness" in the associative striatum (AST) and sensorimotor striatum (SMST). Nicotine concentration correlated negatively with change in BP in the limbic striatum. Nicotine had significant effects on cardiovascular measures including pulse rate, systolic blood pressure (BPr), and diastolic BPr. Baseline [(11)C]raclopride binding potential (BP) in the AST correlated negatively with the Fagerström score, an index of nicotine dependence. These results support a role for the DA system in nicotine addiction, but reveal a more complex relationship than suggested by studies in animals.
PMID: 17492764 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Comments

( 3 comments — Leave a comment )
neptunia67
Nov. 20th, 2007 11:44 pm (UTC)
Ugh - blech.

How do you feel about having/needing to understand this sort of language?
liveonearth
Nov. 20th, 2007 11:52 pm (UTC)
Pretty good. I get frustrated with all the acronyms that scientists use. There's a neverending supply. But it seems I am learning them, gradually. DA = dopamine. BP = blood pressure. There's lots of easy ones.
neptunia67
Nov. 21st, 2007 04:39 am (UTC)
They'll become like a second language to you.
( 3 comments — Leave a comment )

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