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Ten Principles to Live by in Fiercely Complex Times
Tony Schwartz at HBR.org | Tuesday July 12, 2011
http://blogs.hbr.org/schwartz/2011/07/ten-principles-for-living-in-f.html

If you're like most people I work with in companies, the demands come at you from every angle, all day long, and you have to make difficult decisions without much time to think about them. What enduring principles can you rely on to make choices that reflect openness, integrity and authenticity?

Here are ten that work for me:

1. Always challenge certainty, especially your own. When you think you're undeniably right, ask yourself "What might I be missing here?" If we could truly figure it all out, what else would there be left to do?

2. Excellence is an unrelenting struggle, but it's also the surest route to enduring satisfaction. Amy Chua, the over-the-top "Tiger Mother," was right that there's no shortcut to excellence. Getting there requires practicing deliberately, delaying gratification, and forever challenging your current comfort zone.

3. Emotions are contagious, so it pays to know what you're feeling. Think of the best boss you ever had. How did he or she make you feel? That's the way you want to make others feel.

4. When in doubt, ask yourself, "How would I behave here at my best?" We know instinctively what it means to do the right thing, even when we're inclined to do the opposite. If you find it impossible, in a challenging moment, to envision how you'd behave at your best, try imagining how someone you admire would respond.

5. If you do what you love, the money may or may not follow, but you'll love what you do. It's magical thinking to assume you'll be rewarded with riches for following your heart. What it will give you is a richer life. If material riches don't follow, and you decide they're important, there's always time for Plan B.

6. You need less than you think you do. All your life, you've been led to believe that more is better, and that whatever you have isn't enough. It's a prescription for disappointment. Instead ask yourself this: How much of what you already have truly adds value in your life? What could you do without?

7. Accept yourself exactly as you are but never stop trying to learn and grow. One without the other just doesn't cut it. The first, by itself, leads to complacency, the second to self-flagellation. The paradoxical trick is to embrace these opposites, using self-acceptance as an antidote to fear and as a cushion in the face of setbacks.

8. Meaning isn't something you discover, it's something you create, one step at a time. Meaning is derived from finding a way to express your unique skills and passion in the service of something larger than yourself. Figuring out how best to contribute is a lifelong challenge, reborn every day.

9. You can't change what you don't notice and not noticing won't make it go away. Each of us has an infinite capacity for self-deception. To avoid pain, we rationalize, minimize, deny, and go numb. The antidote is the willingness to look at yourself with unsparing honesty, and to hold yourself accountable to the person you want to be.

10. When in doubt, take responsibility. It's called being a true adult.

Tony Schwartz is the president and CEO of The Energy Project and the author of Be Excellent at Anything. Become a fan of The Energy Project on Facebook and connect with Tony at Twitter.com/TonySchwartz and Twitter.com/Energy_Project.

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
bobby1933
Aug. 12th, 2011 03:33 am (UTC)
I liked almost all of these ( a few--not so much)
Thsnk you for sharing them.
liveonearth
Aug. 12th, 2011 04:03 am (UTC)
Which don't you like?
bobby1933
Aug. 12th, 2011 04:36 am (UTC)
Qualified acceptance only for 2), 7), and 9).
2) Does "excellence" mean "quality" and "virtue," if so, o.k. But i think excellence is overrated as a goal. Tiger mother turned me off real bad. Her approach will make or break a growing human being; it will break far more than it makes.

7)Yes, acceptance and striving are important, but the proper balance is not fifty-fifty. Acceptance is far more important, in my opinion, for human being.

9)Most people who are brutally honest with themselves will recognize that they have severe limitations as human beings. If they have a strength somewhere they can be sure to have an equal and compensating weakness in another area. Most people (i almost said all people)who believe the bulk of proposition nine seem to me to be incapable of being "brutally" honest about themselves; many such hardly know themselves. There are many things i do notice that i cannot change, and, if they are things worth noticing (like injustice, oppression, arrogance) noticing them just makes me angry, so i had better control my anger before i start to think about, for example, people who believe proposition 9).
liveonearth
Aug. 15th, 2011 05:20 am (UTC)
Re: Qualified acceptance only for 2), 7), and 9).
Cool. Thanks for being willing to share your opinion! =-]
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )

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